Absent from training; exit for Rangers star on the cards?

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Following on from this morning’s piece on the presences and absences from Rangers’ first day back at training following the summer break, the absence which stood out the most was that of a player whose status at Ibrox has most certainly been up for debate, not just since Pedro took over, but, in truth, since the turn of the year.

Barrie McKay’s debut season in the SPL underwhelmed everyone. While he regained some significant form around December, it did not last, and he soon returned to fairly unimpressive displays from mid-January onwards, which summed his season up.

As long-term fans of McKay, Ibrox Noise bigged him up from his debut in 2012 all the way through to his renaissance under Mark Warburton, and indeed his time in the Championship did appear to point at a complete vindication at our and others’ backing and praising of the young winger, so much so that he managed to earn a cap or two with the national side, following a few call ups.

Unfortunately 2015/2016 was as good as it got for McKay, with last season being, as mentioned, disappointing at best.

Indeed, it does seem Caixinha sensed McKay’s heart did not seem to be fully devoted to the cause, with lightweight displays last season leading to many advocating his dropping to the bench, and aforementioned new manager appeared to agree, with McKay being the high-profile casualty of the new regime.

McKay really did not play much of a role at all under the Portuguese, and his absence from training yesterday certainly does not bode well for his chances of staking a claim for a place next season; neither does Rangers’ enthusiastic pursuit of Graham Dorrans, Daniel Candeias, or even Dalcio Gomes.

For ‘bad boy’ Michael O’Halloran, far from flavour of the month at Ibrox these days, to be at training while his junior colleague was nowhere to be seen painted the full picture.

Of course, McKay’s absence could have been completely innocent – he could have valid reasons for the no-show, and we do account for that, but as mentioned, with all the talent Rangers are seeking to secure, McKay’s future is anything but assured either way.

His ex-coach Mark Warburton has been heavily linked with him, many proposing a multi-million pound bid from the ex-Brentford boss to link up at Nottingham – and it is hard to envisage Rangers saying no to that.

But regardless, Barrie McKay’s future is up in the air, and we will hand it over to you guys; vote below, would you like to keep Barrie McKay or sell him?


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10 COMMENTS

  1. Only sell if the money is right. He certainly has the ability to do well in a better team with superior passers of the ball. He is inconsistent and is a bit fragile with the hammer throwers of the SPL.

    Playing with a fast, tall centre forward would also help him to play better and get on the end of his crosses etc.

  2. The boy is right footed. He has a trick or two to get past a player. He has a fair turn of pace and isn't afraid to have a dig at goal. That's his good points.
    On the downside, he is nowhere near consistent enough. He doesn't like the rough stuff. Fair enough, he's small and on the light side. But as a professional footballer he MUST show more courage, run at players, close quarters and take the knocks. Refs will only let them away with so much, so he must dig in early on and show he will not stop coming at them.
    I think he can make it, if he believes in himself and shows a bit more readiness to get in and about the opposition.

    One more thing. His left foot crossing and passing is very very ordinary. Coming inside is too predictable in his play. The boy MUST be played on the right side. He also needs Rangers using both wings. That will decrease the times that the opposition can just move players across to double up on him. he got that a lot last season. The new guy Dalcio, on the left, should help there.
    I'd keep him. But only if he signs a reasonable deal for now. Two years to make sure he doesn't walk for free if he has a good season. Realistic wages too. He has to remember he is not a "star" just yet. He should be very grateful to be a Rangers player. They all should.

    • Spot on as usual William, I agree with every point you've made. I hope he stays and fulfills his potential with us… it's no wonder he's been inconsistent…given his age and calibre of player he's had to carry of late. This is the most optimistic I've felt these last few years, be a shame if he goes now … given he's been on the journey and he won't get another chance to play for us.

    • I agree with your comments entirely too, if we keep him he must be played on the right or through the middle for effect in a tactical switch during the game where he has played well at times.
      He isn't any slighter in build than Tommy McLean, Willie Henderson, Willie Johnston or the other Johnstone from the other lot, in days gone by and look at the hammering they got with little or no protection from the referees in those days and Bud was very fleet of foot too. So if we do keep him he has to knuckle down and toughen up, some players get worse injuries pulling out of tackles.

    • Tommy McLean wasn't the "bravest heart" Alan. My old Dad used to call him the "yellow streak". But he played on the right, his real position.
      He could get a head of steam up and pass a player, had great vision for opening up defences could cross from the byline and was a dead ball specialist. We played to his strengths.
      Willie Henderson was one of my all time favourites. Great wee player, but went into his shell when he got that "bunion trouble" that really dented his career.
      Willie Johnston. My favourite Rangers player of them all. including Big John. He had it all. TWO great feet. Could really jump for a wee guy. A bag of tricks, great touch, blistering pace and the heart of a lion. His one "fault". Willie had a really bad temper. Although, that would be welcome today, I think.
      All the best Alan McD and to Neil. C'mon the Gers.

  3. Just as well the "Tinternet" wasn't about around the early 80s period as Davy Cooper would have been a cert to get his P45 and the reason Coops form dipped badly for a considerable time was that he was surrounded by the same calibre of squad as last season, the majority of which were mediocre at best, apart of course from Jim Bett, Bobby Russell and 1 or 2 others

    If the boys heart isn't in then that is a different story but there is, to my knowledge, absolutely no evidence to support this accusation, and at the end of the day mud sticks

    Anyone who cant see that this boy IS in possession of exceptional natural skill, I would suggest, should go out this weekend and buy themselves a collie dug & a white stick

    IF he stays for another season and IF our new recruits are anything like as good as we hope they are then you will undoubtedly see a marked improvement in his performances, similar to that of Super Cooper when the revolution started in 86, simply because he will hopefully be tuned into players operating on the same PLANET as he does

    Look down the last 20 years and take note of how many players, who were all heralded as world beaters, actually done a turn for us, I think you will find the disappointing result to be around 35%-40% success rate at best

    Dont throw the wean oot wi the bath watter is as good and sensible approach today as it was in my grannies day

    WATP

    • Great post and all true. I still think the best I saw McKay play was through the middle as a "10". Asking him to play left and cross on a weak foot is not going to get any consistency out of him any time soon.

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